Economical, Reliable and Efficient

Recovery of the energy content of waste is a key aspect of energy-from-waste. As this process is low in emissions and renewable to a great extent, it contributes to the reduction of greenhouse gases. Extracted energy is used in the way that best meets the needs of the client. We distinguish between three main concepts: Electric Power, Combined Heat and Power, and Combinded Cold and Power.


Electric Power  l  Combined Heat and Power  l  Combined Cold and Power


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Electric Power

Proven and Reliable Base-Load Power

The electric power plant concept is well known, reliable and easy to operate. Superheated steam from the boiler drives a steam turbine connected to a generator. The electricity produced by the generator is fed into a public electricity network. Within the turbine the steam expands and cools down. Thereafter it is condensed in an air- or water-cooled condenser. To close the cycle, the condensate is pumped back to the boiler as feedwater and converted to steam again.

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Combined Heat and Power

For Households and Industrial Facilities

Cogeneration, the simultaneous production of electric power and heat, offers high efficiency and maximum energy yield. If there is beneficial use for heat, the steam cycle can be adjusted in various ways depending on the amount and temperature level of the required heat. While a higher heat demand reduces electricity production, it increases the total energy efficiency of the complete plant. A completely redundant concept ensures safe and reliable supply of heat and power around the clock and throughout the year.

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Combined Cold and Power

Feeding Public Electricity Networks

The combined heat and cold plant concept allows the use of heat in countries where rather air conditioning is required than heating. A completely redundant plant concept ensures a safe and reliable 24/7 supply of cold throughout the year. Superheated steam from the boiler drives a steam turbine connected to a generator. The electricity produced by the generator is fed into a public electricity network. Part of the steam is extracted from the turbine at a higher pressure. It drives an adsorption chiller which converts the heat into cold water which can be supplied to consumers, e.g. via a district cooling network. The rest of the steam is completely expanded in the turbine and condensed in an air- or water-cooled condenser. The amount of extraction steam used for cooling can be varied according to demand.

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